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Sunday, April 09, 2006

Immigrants Pay Taxes

Linda Chavez:

[The] overwhelming majority of illegal aliens pay taxes, including Social Security, Medicare and property taxes, not to mention sales taxes. The chief actuary of the Social Security Administration estimates that three-fourths of all illegal aliens have Social Security (and Medicare) taxes deducted from their wages. How? It's simple.

Since it is illegal to hire someone who does not present a Social Security number (and show other documentation of legal residence), many illegal aliens use phony numbers or cards to get jobs. In 2002 alone, the Social Security Administration reported it had collected $7 billion in payroll taxes and $1.5 billion in Medicare taxes from workers who could not be matched with valid Social Security numbers.

In addition, illegal aliens pay property taxes just like everyone else, either directly, if they own homes (and surprising numbers of illegal aliens do), or indirectly through their landlords' property taxes in the form of rent. Most illegal aliens pay income taxes -- since these, too, are automatically deducted -- but they fail to claim any refunds since they are fearful of drawing attention to their illegal status.

1 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

How? It's simple.

Since it is illegal to hire someone who does not present a Social Security number (and show other documentation of legal residence), many illegal aliens use phony numbers or cards to get jobs.


Amazing and rather humerous that in an article where Linda Chavez is trying to convince us that besides the act of coming here illegally that illegal aliens are "otherwise law-abiding citizens" she describes them using a fraudulent social security number which is a felony punishable by fines and prison.

This type of argument where pro-illegal alien apologists point to all the taxes that the aliens pay while conveniently forgetting to mention the even greater costs they impose on tax payers is really very disingenuous.

At the Federal level, illegal aliens consume $10 billion annually more in services then they contribute to the treasury. At the state level, they impose a much greater burden on taxpayers. If they are made legal and become eligible for the full buffet of services intended for low income workers such as EITC, medicaid, federal housing assistance, foodstamps, their cost to taxpayers will grow by three-fold and as Linda Chavez points out they are already paying taxes so we will see little offsetting increase in revenue.

When we import poverty, it just makes sense that spending on programs aimed at the poor will climb.

4/09/2006 9:59 PM  

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